ACE: A Colour Palette Design Tool for Balancing Aesthetics and Accessibility

Colour can convey a mood or elicit a particular emotion and, in terms of web design, colour can influence attitudes, perceptions, and behaviours. However, many websites demonstrate inaccessible colour choices. Numerous online colour palette design tools only focus on assisting designers with either the aesthetics or accessibility of colours. With a user-centered design approach, we … Continue reading “ACE: A Colour Palette Design Tool for Balancing Aesthetics and Accessibility”

SPRWeb: Preserving Subjective Responses to Website Colour Schemes through Automatic Recolouring

Colours are an important part of user experiences on the Web. Colour schemes influence the aesthetics, first impressions and long-term engagement with websites. However, five percent of people perceive a subset of all colours because they have colour vision deficiency (CVD), resulting in an unequal and less-rich user experience on the Web. Traditionally, people with … Continue reading “SPRWeb: Preserving Subjective Responses to Website Colour Schemes through Automatic Recolouring”

Situation-Specific Models of Color Differentiation

Color is commonly used to represent categories and values in computer applications, but users with Color-Vision Deficiencies (CVD) often have difficulty differentiating these colors. Recoloring tools have been developed to address the problem, but current recolorers are limited in that they work from a model of only one type of congenital CVD (i.e., dichromatism). This … Continue reading “Situation-Specific Models of Color Differentiation”

Oh that’s what you meant!: reducing emoji misunderstanding

Emoji provide a way to express nonverbal conversational cues in computer-mediated communication. However, people need to share the same understanding of what each emoji symbolises, otherwise communication can breakdown. We surveyed 436 people about their use of emoji and ran an interactive study using a two-dimensional emotion space to investigate (1) the variation in people’s … Continue reading “Oh that’s what you meant!: reducing emoji misunderstanding”